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DONATION CHARTER

Our Donor Charter

  • We are committed to improving outcomes for native animals
  • We act with integrity and use donations wisely
  • We value your feedback and respect your privacy

Donations to WIRES are used to:

  • Improve our capability to rescue and care for more animals
  • Operate our Wildlife Rescue Office 365 days a year
  • Subsidise food costs for wildlife in care
  • Provide community wildlife information and education
  • Provide wildlife training courses for volunteers and the community
  • Support our volunteers
  • Grow our service so that we can help wildlife for generations to come

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Did you know that WIRES...

  • Receives tens of thousands of calls each year to help sick, injured and orphaned native animals.
  • Trains hundreds of people in wildlife rescue and care every year and has 2500 volunteers
  • Has been serving wildlife and the community for almost 30 years
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Forbidden Fruit 

As land clearing and urbanisation continues to reduce Flying-foxes’ natural food sources, it has been necessary for bats to seek exotic fruit. 

Backyard fruit trees can be a convenient source of food for bats but sadly this convenience can come at a great cost as they often come into contact with one of their greatest threats; tree netting.

When Flying-foxes try to access fruit from a netted tree they can easily become entangled. Their toes, feet and wings go through the holes and as they twist and turn their bodies in attempts to free themselves, the netting can often become wrapped around their neck and constrict tighter around their fragile limbs.

Netting entanglement can result in constriction injuries, as the net cuts off blood supply to parts of their bodies, abrasions, and fractures. 

As the foraging and subsequent entanglement occurs during the night when the bats are active, the large majority of animals are not discovered by the property owners until the morning, by which time they are usually severely dehydrated and exhausted.

Netting rescues require specialised equipment, extensive first aid products, and attention to detail.

Each and every rescue is time sensitive, rescuers work as fast as they can to free the bat from netting and get them rehydrated. 

This has been a particularly bad season for entanglements as many native flowers have failed to blossom. WIRES responded to just under 1,000 netting rescues in the first three months of 2019.

Help WIRES continue to rescue Flying-Foxes and promote wildlife friendly alternatives by donating today. Together, we can save the lives of hundreds of animals every year. 









  

Forbidden Fruit

As land clearing and urbanisation continues to reduce Flying-foxes’ natural food sources, it has been necessary for bats to seek exotic fruit. 

Backyard fruit trees can be a convenient source of food for bats but sadly this convenience can come at a great cost as they often come into contact with one of their greatest threats; tree netting.

When Flying-foxes try to access fruit from a netted tree they can easily become entangled. Their toes, feet and wings go through the holes and as they twist and turn their bodies in attempts to free themselves, the netting can often become wrapped around their neck and constrict tighter around their fragile limbs.